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Music as Therapy: A Dialogical Perspective

Author : Rudy Garred

Music as Therapy: A Dialogical Perspective
ISBN : 9781891278402
E-ISBN : 9781891278785


There has for some years now been a debate within the field of music therapy on the issue of music-centered therapy. This book relates to this discussion and presents a contribution. The thesis that is put forward is that a dialogical perspective may serve to frame such therapy. Or, rather, for music as therapy, which is the term that is used here. Some might want to claim that there is no such thing as music as therapy, that the only real therapy there is, is some already established mode of therapy in which music plays a subordinate part, music in therapy. In this book, the attempt is to show a different picture, one which includes also the possibility of music as therapy, that is to say, therapy based on qualities of the medium itself. A particularly much-debated issue has been whether verbal processing is necessary for actual therapy to take place. This book presents and discusses some of the crucial issues involved, and develops a theory to bring out potentials of an experiential, transformative music therapy, in which verbal processing, talking cure style, is not necessarily incorporated. The models related to, and exemplified through vignettes from practice, are mostly improvisational, but the perspective drawn is applied to some extent also to other modalities, such as community-oriented practices and receptive, listening-based music therapy.2006, Paperback, 344 pages.

 

 


 

 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
   
PREFACE  
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  

1. FRAME AND PICTURE 


THE TERM MUSIC THERAPY
Music-centered Therapy
Analysis and Synthesis
Music Problems
THE NEED FOR VERBAL PROCESSING
Questioning the Need to Verbalize
Psychodynamically Informed Music Therapy
Recent Analytical Developments
DEVELOPMENT OF THEORY
Early Interaction Analogy
Not the same as Music
New Musicology
Health Musicking
The Meaning of Words and of Music
Clinical and Music-based Theories
Community Music Therapy
DIFFERENCES OF ASSUMPTIONS
General Theory
Recognizing and Accepting Difference
Indigenous and Imported Theory
Music-centered thinking
Insight and Transformative Therapies
Music as Therapy
Philosophy, Theory, and Practice
A Humanistic Foundation
A Dialogical Perspective

 

2. DIALOGUE
 

ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF THE CONCEPT
Two Historical Phases
MAIN TENETS
Three Spheres
Second Versus Third Person
Immediacy
Presence and Object
The Whole Being Involved
Encounter
Mutuality
Responsibility
Actuality and Latency
The Eternal You
COMMENTARY
Theology and Philosophy
The Problem of Intersubjectivity
Applications to Psychotherapy
On Freuds Psychoanalysis
The Debate with Jung
Postmodern Themes
CRITICISMS
Explanation and Understanding
The Constructive Role of It
A WAY OF VIEWING

 

3. THE MUSIC THERAPY TRIAD
 

ENCOUNTER WITH MUSIC
Relating to, and Talking About
The Creative Encounter
The Work Acted Upon, and the Person
Artistic and Musicological Objectifications
THE MUSICAL WORK
Other Ontologies of Music
Music Embedded in Culture
Music, Therapist, and Client
MUSIC AS A MEANS
The Logic of Means and End
Playing the Piano for Some Other Purpose
A Counterexample
Treating Human Beings as Things
Humanistic Critique of Reification
Music as a Physical Object
THE MUSIC THERAPY TRIANGLE
An Illustrative Example: Annabel
Music as a Medium
A Medium for Therapy
Interpersonal and Musical Relational Fields
DIFFERENT SPHERES OF RELATION

 

4. RELATIONAL KNOWING 103
 

THE EARLY INTERACTION ANALOGY
The Innate You
Affect Attunement and Connection
Dynamic Form
Spoken and Heard
Change Processes in Therapy
IMPLICIT RELATIONAL KNOWING
The Moment of Meeting
Three Phases of Transition
Transference Issues Minimized
A Change that Happens
Psychodynamic and Humanistic Interdialogue
APPLICATION TO EXAMPLES FROM THE LITERATURE
The Example of David
The Example of Mathew
Relational Change
AN EXAMPLE FROM MY OWN PRACTICE: LISA
A Drum-Playing Incident
The Relationship Changed
A Meeting Through Music

 

5. RELATING TO MUSIC
 

COMING TO KNOW
Getting to Know Music
Change in the Relation to Music
CHANGE IN THE SENSE OF SELF
Peak Experience
Integrating the Experience
Incremental Changes
Musical Transference
RELATING THE INTERPERSONAL AND THE MUSICAL
Playing Together
Communitas
Two Intercrossing Lines
SUBSTITUTING WORDS WITH MUSIC
Dynamic and Aesthetic Form
Three Sides Interrelated, Across Two Spheres
Encounter With and Through Music
Music and Words

 

6. ROLES OF MUSIC, WAYS OF TALKING
 

COMPARING MODELS IDEAL-TYPICALLY
Creative Music Therapy
Analytical Music Therapy
Referential Improvisation
An Active Approach
Function versus Overall Change
Resolving Conflict
Resistiveness and Participation
Musical Progression
Words Facilitating Music
Music Translated
Music as a World
The Musical Relational Field
PROJECTION AND EXPRESSION
A Symbolic Projection
An Aesthetic Expression
Beyond the Individual
A Hermeneutics of Suspicion
An Example of Priestleys
Reading the Client through Dynamic Form
VERBALIZATION REQUIREMENT
On the Possible Integration of the Perspectives
Shifting Between One and the Other
Different Roles, Different Plays
Differences within each Model Too
WAYS OF TALKING
A Confused Issue
Believing in what is said

 

7. A FORMED IMAGE OF MUSIC

BUBER'S VIEW ON ART

A DEFINITION OF MUSIC

A PHENOMENOLOGICAL ORIENTATION

MUSIC AS ACTIVITY

BEYOND AESTHETICS

 

 

8. OUTLINING A RATIONALE
 

PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Return to Immediacy
Turning Toward the Other
Capacity to Relate
THE THERAPISTS RESPONSIBILITY
Artistic and Therapeutic Imagination
The Notion of Empathy
A Therapeutic Pursuit
WORKING AND PLAYING
The Concept of Play
No Fixed Correspondence
Expression by Simple Means
The Whole Person Engaged
A Shared Momment
Gradual Development and Sudden Change
A Summary of the Therapeutic process
The example of Ole
The Two sides of Working and Playing
ENHANCING RESOURCES
No Specific Client Group
Repair and Regeneration
MUSICAL CHANGE AND PERSONAL CHANGE
What and How
Spirit and Grace
The Way of Playing
The Notion of Spirit

 

9. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE
 

A RESOURCE-ORIENTED APPROACH
Different Roads, Different Destinations
Transcending Limitations
Various Institutional Settings
Diagnosis and Assessment
Intervention versus Healing Practice
Mis-matching as Clinical Intervention
THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUE
Idioms Facilitating Creativity
Idioms in Therapy
Relating Music to the Client
A Conversational Principle
An Image in the Likeness of
Aesthetic Properties
Musical Significance
Something Itself to Relate to
EXPRESSIVE RESOURCES
The Middle Eastern Scale as an example
The Power of the Response
THE POTENTIALS OF THE MOMENT
A Way
THE ASPECT OF CULTURE
Music and Identity

 

10. COMMUNITY-ORIENTED THERAPY
 

EXPANSIONS OF THE THERAPEUTIC SETTING
Communal Dialogue
PERFORMANCE-BASED APPROACH
The Issue of Confidentiality
Becoming Known
The Audience as an Additional Actor
Therapeutic Potentials of the Social Dimension
RETAINING A FOCUS ON THE PERSON
The Case of Josie
THERAPEUTIC CONTRACT

 

11. THE RECEPTIVE MODE
 

TRAVELER, GUIDE, MUSIC, AND IMAGERY
Two Approaches
Transference onto Music
RELATING DIRECTLY TO MUSIC
Using Classical Music
Listening Competency
On Knowing some Music
THERAPEUTIC PROCESS
The Work and the Play
Attending to the Traveler
Sharing in the Experience
AN EXAMPLE FROM A SESSION OF MY OWN
Music into the foreground
Outcome
AN OPTION OPENED FOR
Probing or Letting Be
PROCESSING THE EXPERIENCE
Not Reducing to Personal Conflict Matters
Other Modalities than Music in BMGIM
All Music Experience also Receptive

 

12. REMEMBERING AND FORGETTING
 

A THEORY FOR MUSIC AS MUSIC IN THERAPY
Verbalization Issue
An Aesthetics of Music for Music Therapy
The Therapeutic Relationship
A General Theory of Music as Therapy
THE BASIS FOR FURTHER DEVELOPMENT
Research and Reflexivity
Creative Development
An Ethical Basis
THEORY FOR REMEMBERING
Forgetting, for Direct Relation

REFERENCES

AUTHOR INDEX

TABLES

FIGURES